Warren Launches White House Bid Calling for ‘Structural Change’

Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) has officially kicked off her 2020 bid for the White House, joining a Democratic primary field that promises to be among the largest and most diverse in the party’s history.

The announcement, at the event in her home state of Massachusetts, came more than a month after Warren formed an exploratory committee that allowed her to begin raising money for a presidential campaign. Since then, she has crisscrossed early primary states and hired staffers to lay the framework for a campaign.

Introducing Warren at her event on Saturday was Rep. Joe Kennedy III (D-Mass.), a rising star in the Democratic Party and an heir to the Kennedy political dynasty who is one of the first high-profile lawmakers to endorse Warren for the presidency. She was also joined by her fellow home-state Senate colleague Ed Markey (D-Mass.).

The location of Warren’s announcement was significant in itself. Lawrence was the site of the “Bread and Roses” strike of textile workers in 1912, considered a landmark moment for labor in the U.S.

Warren portrayed herself as a fighter willing to pursue large-scale reform, saying, "It won’t be enough to just undo the terrible acts of this administration. We can’t afford to just tinker around the edges – a tax credit here, a regulation there. Our fight is for big, structural change."

Dominating Warren’s message on Saturday were themes that have characterized much of the presidential candidate’s career. She railed against special interests and Wall Street and called for higher wages for workers. “We need to take power in Washington away from the wealthy and well-connected and put it back in the hands of the people where it belongs," she said.

Also interspersed throughout her announcement speech were acknowledgements of pervasive racial inequality in U.S. economic security.

“I’ve spent most of my life studying what happens to families like mine, families caught in the squeeze, families that go broke,” she said. “And what I found was that year after year, the path to economic security had gotten tougher and rockier for working families, and even tougher and even rockier for people of color."

Warren, a former law professor who has built a reputation as a fierce critic of Wall Street and the financial services industry, first entered the Senate in 2013 after defeating incumbent Sen. Scott Brown (R-Mass.).

She quickly defined herself as a progressive firebrand, especially through her position on the Senate Banking Committee. Since then, she has found herself among a handful of politicians floated as possible presidential candidates.

In mounting a White House bid, Warren will have to vie against a crowded field of Democratic contenders, including several of her Senate colleagues. So far, Democratic Sens. Kirsten Gillibrand (NY), Kamala Harris (CA) and Cory Booker (NJ) have announced campaigns of their own.

Other political giants, like former Vice President Joe Biden (DE) and Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT), are said to be nearing campaign announcements as well.

Source: The Hill

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